Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Churchill and socialism



Image result for churchill images
Here is a great quote by Winston Churchill:

"The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries."

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Shades of Churchill's 'Iron Curtain Speech'



(My American Thinker post)

It was a remarkable speech. PM Netanyahu spoke clearly, forcefully, and eloquently about the nuclear deal. This is one of those "must-watch speeches" that comes along once a generation.

It reminded us of another statesman who came to the U.S. many years ago. It was on March 5, 1946 that the then former PM Winston Churchill of the UK spoke to the American people about the Soviet threat. Mr. Churchill did not speak to a joint session but the impact was awesome:
"Churchill, who had been defeated for re-election as prime minister in 1945, was invited to Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri where he gave this speech. 
President Harry S. Truman joined Churchill on the platform and listened intently to his speech. 
Churchill began by praising the United States, which he declared stood “at the pinnacle of world power.” 
It soon became clear that a primary purpose of his talk was to argue for an even closer “special relationship” between the United States and Great Britain -- the great powers of the “English-speaking world” -- in organizing and policing the postwar world. In particular, he warned against the expansionistic policies of the Soviet Union. 
In addition to the “iron curtain” that had descended across Eastern Europe, Churchill spoke of “communist fifth columns” that were operating throughout western and southern Europe. 
Drawing parallels with the disastrous appeasement of Hitler prior to World War II, Churchill advised that in dealing with the Soviets there was “nothing which they admire so much as strength, and there is nothing for which they have less respect than for military weakness.”
Like Mr. Churchill, the prime minister of Israel praised the alliance between the two countries, thanked the U.S. for its sacrifices in World War II, and explained the threat in exquisite detail.   

Of course, President Obama was not there and VP Biden was down in Uruguay at a presidential inauguration. There were several Democrats missing, a rather silly display of political pique.

It once again makes you wonder about President Obama's instincts or the people that he listens to.

What if President Obama had taken advantage of this opportunity to make his case for the nuclear deal?What if President Obama had embraced the visit? What if he did a joint press conference with the prime minister and assured this deal was good for all, especially Israel?


Instead, President Obama looks small and petty. He looks like a man who was avoiding the debate or hiding the truth of the deal with Iran.

My guess is that the nuclear deal is dead. You can delete another "legacy item" from President Obama's accomplishments.

P.S. You can hear my show (CantoTalk) or follow me on Twitter.

1874: Winston Churchill was born

churchill

We love “leadership” and great leaders to run our countries.   Today, we remember Winston Churchill, one of the giants of the 20th century who was born on this day in 1874:
“Churchill came from a prestigious family with a long history of military service and joined the British Fourth Hussars upon his father’s death in 1895. During the next five years, he enjoyed an illustrious military career, serving in India, the Sudan, and South Africa, and distinguishing himself several times in battle. In 1899, he resigned his commission to concentrate on his literary and political career and in 1900 was elected to Parliament as a Conservative MP from Oldham. In 1904, he joined the Liberals, serving in a number of important posts before being appointed Britain’s First Lord of the Admiralty in 1911, where he worked to bring the British navy to a readiness for the war he foresaw.
In 1915, in the second year of World War I, Churchill was held responsible for the disastrous Dardanelles and Gallipoli campaigns, and he was excluded from the war coalition government. He resigned and volunteered to command an infantry battalion in France. However, in 1917, he returned to politics as a cabinet member in the Liberal government of Lloyd George. From 1919 to 1921, he was secretary of state for war and in 1924 returned to the Conservative Party, where two years later he played a leading role in the defeat of the General Strike of 1926.
Out of office from 1929 to 1939, Churchill issued unheeded warnings of the threat of German and Japanese aggression.
After the outbreak of World War II in Europe, Churchill was called back to his post as First Lord of the Admiralty and eight months later replaced the ineffectual Neville Chamberlain as prime minister of a new coalition government. In the first year of his administration, Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany, but Churchill promised his country and the world that the British people would “never surrender.” He rallied the British people to a resolute resistance and expertly orchestrated Franklin D. Rooseveltand Joseph Stalin into an alliance that eventually crushed the Axis.
In July 1945, 10 weeks after Germany’s defeat, his Conservative government suffered an electoral loss against Clement Attlee’s Labour Party, and Churchill resigned as prime minister. He became leader of the opposition and in 1951 was again elected prime minister.
Two years later, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for his six-volume historical study of World War II and for his political speeches.
In 1955, he retired as prime minister but remained in Parliament until 1964, the year before his death.”
There are several lessons from Churchill’s life:
1) Failure is a part of life.  Mr Churchill failed but never gave up;
2) “Call out evil”, as he did over and over again when he spoke about Hitler in the 1930’s; and,
3) Take time for your hobbies, from writing to painting.  
Winston Churchill was a giant of a man.  I hope that the young people are reading about his life and how he used words.
P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.  If you like our posts, drop a dime here.







Sunday, November 28, 2010

Happy # 62 Dave Righetti


We say happy birthday to Dave Righetti born in San Jose, California on this day in 1958.

Dave broke with the Yankees in 1979 but did not join the rotation until 1981.   He spent the 1980's with New York saving over 200 games.    

Unfortunately, he missed the pennant teams but did pitch in the 1981 post season when he was also voted AL Rookie of the Year.

On July 4, 1983, Dave pitched a no hitter against the Red Sox.   He was 10-3 at that point and finished 14-8, or his best season as a starter.

He was the Giants' pitching coach and a part of the team that won The World Series in 2010, 2012 & 2014.

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.  If you like our posts, drop a dime here.

Saturday, November 27, 2010

Remember The Supremes!



Our family came to the US in 1964. It didn't take long for my brother and I to get into Top 40 radio, which is what they used to call AM radio stations back then.

Between 1964 and 1967, the US music charts were dominated by British bands like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Dave Clark 5, The Animals and so on.   It was called "The British Invasion"!

Who stood up for the US during that period?  What US group battled the British for the top of the charts?

The answer was The Supremes from Detroit with 12 # 1 songs, many gold records and regular TV appearances.  They were huge! 

Who else but The Beatles had that many # 1 songs? Again, it was The Supremes.

They were Diana Ross, Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard. They used to call it "The Motown Sound"! 

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk).  If you like our posts, drop a dime here.
 





Friday, November 26, 2010

2003: President Bush and Thanksgiving in Iraq


Image result for president bush iraq thanksgiving imagesSeveral years ago, I became fascinated with presidential proclamations, from President Washington in 1789, President Lincoln during the Civil War, and President Reagan in 1988.  
So let’s remember one president who spent Thanksgiving in a very unique way.
We’ve had some talk lately about President Bush and the decision to take out Saddam Hussein.  I continue to support the action. 
North Korea is what happens when you leave people in power who have or look to have weapons of mass destruction. The Middle East would look a lot different today if Iraq was conducting nuclear tests or threatening to hit Israel or others.
Back in 2003, President Bush showed up in Iraq for Thanksgiving. It was a great story and must have been quite a treat for the soldiers enjoying some turkey:  
Mr. Bush sneaked out of Crawford on Wednesday in an unmarked car, then flew to Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington, where a few advisers and a small number of reporters sworn to secrecy joined him. They then flew on to Baghdad International Airport, arriving around dusk.
He spent 2 hours 32 minutes in the country, dining with the chief United States administrator there, L. Paul Bremer III, and sharing Thanksgiving wishes with about 600 troops at an airport hangar. Mr. Bush actually helped serve dinner to the troops, who had been told they would be dining with Mr. Bremer and with Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, commander of coalition forces in Iraq.
He also met with four members of the Iraqi Governing Council.
The trip must have raised enormous concerns for the president’s security team. A DHL cargo plane using the same airport Saturday was struck in the wing by a shoulder-fired missile, forcing it to make an emergency landing. Such missiles, reliant on visual contact with their targets, are considered ineffective after dark, however.
For security reasons, the President’s trip was such a secret that even First Lady Laura Bush and his parents were not told about it. It must have been quite a surprise when plans changed from Crawford to Iraq.
Many years later, I say thanks that President Bush took out Saddam Hussein and prevented Iraq from turning into North Korea.  
My guess is that Iraq’s neighbors share my sentiments.
P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

A 2015 Thanksgiving message for our friends and listeners




Thursday, November 25, 2010

Sorry, lefties, but Pinochet looks better every day

Image result for augusto pinochet images
Augusto Pinochet was born on this day in 1915.  He died in 2006.
There are no shades of gray with this man.  People love or hate him.
Many of us remember Pinochet as the man who saved Chile from misguided socialism and created the most successful economy in Latin America.  The left created this villain named Pinochet who tortured people and filled the prisons.  In fact, the real villains who torture are the ones the left has supported or endorsed, such as Che! 
What’s the truth?  He was not “Santo Augusto,” but his legacy is the best economy in Latin America.
Like any dictator, Pinochet had absolute power and reminded his enemies of it every time there was a crackdown or demonstration.
 
To be fair, Pinochet’s opposition had a huge advantage over dissidents in Cuba like Armando Valladares and the torture chambers of North Korea.
Pinochet was bad, but he allowed the foreign press to cover domestic events.  In other words, major international newspapers had bureaus in Santiago and operated freely in the country.
Let me ask you this: how many times did the international press visit a Cuban or North Korean political prison?
Did the Kremlin allow Western reporters in The Gulag Archipelago?
Some of us are old enough to remember what President Salvador Allende did to Chile.
In the early 1970s, my parents had many Chilean friends.  I remember many dinner table conversations about Chile, Allende, and later Pinochet.
Allende was elected with 36% of the vote in a contest that was eventually settled in the Supreme Court.  He shocked most Chileans by nationalizing the means of production and expropriating foreign-owned industries, banks, corporations, and estates.
By the summer of ’73, Chile was a disaster.  It was pure economic chaos.  To be sure, Allende had gone too far, and most Chileans were scared.
I recall a family friend who came back from Chile and was horrified with the insecurity in his homeland.  He said his countrymen were afraid to walk the streets, and everyone was dumping the national currency for gold or anything not paper-based.  Bartering became a necessity.  Like Cuba, food shortages were common.
In other words, Salvador Allende was not the romantic figure the anti-U.S. left created.  He was an incompetent leader who started a leftist revolution in a country that did not vote for one.
On September 11, 1973, Pinochet overthrew Allende.  Eventually, Allende shot himself!
Pinochet quickly moved to fix the Chilean economy.  In fact, he presided over an economic miracle.  Pinochet inherited triple-digit inflation and left an economy that is the envy of the continent.
Later, he brought in Milton Friedman’s “Chicago Boys.”
They cut spending, privatized public enterprises, provided generous incentives for foreign investors, deregulated the banks, lowered trade barriers, and promoted exports.
It worked.  Chile has been the best economy in Latin America in the last 45 years!  No one disputes that!
Pinochet made mistakes.  However, he accepted a referendum and walked away from power in ’88.
How many dictators have held a referendum and respected the results?
For many years, Chile has had elections, and no one has reversed Pinochet’s economic plan.
The left hated Pinochet.  The left criticized Pinochet for human rights abuses and kept its mouth shut on Fidel Castro’s excesses.  As always, the international left showed its selective indignation on human rights abuses.
In the U.S., Pinochet was criticized by Jesse Jackson and Hollywoodies.  They hated Pinochet because of his connection to Kissinger and Nixon.  As President Nixon wrote in his memoirs, a communist regime like Cuba in South America was an unacceptable alternative.
Make no mistake: Allende was on his way to turn Chile into Cuba, with lots of copper and silver to go with it!
Unfortunately, Jesse and the actors did not show the same concern for Cuban political prisoners.
Like any strong leader, Pinochet leaves a mixed record.  However, I rate him as a positive for Chile.
He gets low marks for “human rights” and very high marks for economic policies.  I would add that many of those anti-Pinochet demonstrations in the streets of Chile were often arranged and calculated for media coverage.
My overall grade is very good!
Latin America has had a lot of bad leaders.  Pinochet was not one of them!
In fact, I argue that Pinochet ranks rather high compared with his contemporaries, such as the aforementioned Fidel and Raúl Castro and the mess that Cuba is today; Mexico’s disastrous populist 1970s under President Echeverria and the corrupt President Lopez-Portillo; Venezuela’s irresponsible President Carlos Andres Perez, who sort of set table for the Hugo Chávez disaster still ongoing; and some of the juntas that governed other South American countries.
In sum, Chile could have done a lot worse than Pinochet!
Again, all things considered, Pinochet left a better Chile than the one he inherited.  And that’s legacy!
PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk).

A president, a turkey pardon, and talk of amnesty?

For the record, I like the "turkey pardon" tradition.  It's a fun moment in a much too darn serious town.

This year, President Obama tried to make a connection between the "turkey pardon" and the executive order that he signed.  It went like this:
"I know some will call this amnesty," Obama said, "but don't worry, there's plenty of turkey to go around."
Frankly, it was not funny.

First, President Obama has the authority to pardon.  It's in black and white in the U.S. Constitution.  Every president has done it going back to President Washington.  It's not an issue, unless President Clinton pardons a man like Marc Rich and people scream a little.  The other controversial pardon was the Nixon pardon from 1974 but most historians credit President Ford for making the right callafter Watergate.

Second, the executive order to stop deportations is not a presidential power.  It is an overreach, even if some of us agree that "DREAMers," or others who've worked here for many years, should be provided a path to legalization after meeting certain conditions.   

The difference is rather clear.  He has the authority to pardon – even a turkey.  He does not have the authority to change or make law, as he told us for several years when he addressed Hispanic audiences on immigration.

Finally, why would he use a "turkey pardon" moment to take a shot at his critics?   
The answer is that President Obama is very thin-skinned and does not take criticism well.  He seems unable to understand that some people have honest differences of opinion.

The other answer is that he is angry and bitter that the next two years will not be any fun.  After all, even Dana Milbank now writes that "Obama is turning into Bush."  It won't be any fun sending ground troops back to Iraq or watching Obamacare implode.

P.S. You can hear CANTO TALK here & follow me on Twitter @ scantojr.

We remember the great Joe DiMaggio (1914-99)

Image result for joe dimaggio images 
The great Joe DiMaggio was born in San Francisco on this day in 1914.    He died in 1999.

We've posted a lot about his 56 game hitting streak.   Of course, Joe was more than the streak.   He won MVP's and led the Yankees to several World Series titles.    He was the best player in the best team in baseball.

DiMaggio retired after the 1951 season:   a .325 average, 361 HR, 1,537 RBI in 1,736 games.  

In this book, you will learn that Joe was very quiet and shy but he could hit.

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.  If you like our posts, drop a dime here.



Tags: Super Joe DiMaggio To share or post to your site, click on "Post Link". Please mention / link to the My View by Silvio Canto, Jr. Thanks!

Happy Thanksgiving: Go Cowboys & thanks to all of the mothers for making the turkey!

We take a day off from the politics to wish you and your family a very Happy Thanksgiving holiday.

As we've posted, Thanksgiving is a unique US holiday. 

I can still recall our first Thanksgiving in the US in 1964.  It was a wonderful moment.  It was a treat to read about it in school and to enjoy the meaning of the holiday with everyone.

Of course, our first Thanksgiving was truly a moment to say "thanks" for the opportunity to leave communist Cuba and live in the US.

So enjoy the day.  We will do the same.

Of course, it will be a perfect day if Dallas wins today.

So go Cowboys!

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.


Why all of the turkey posters? My first Thanksgiving in the U.S.


Back in 1941, President Roosevelt made it official:
Thanksgiving became an annual custom throughout New England in the 17th century, and in 1777 the Continental Congress declared the first national American Thanksgiving following the Patriot victory at Saratoga.
In 1789, President George Washington became the first president to proclaim a Thanksgiving holiday, when, at the request of Congress, he proclaimed November 26, a Tuesday, as a day of national thanksgiving for the U.S. Constitution.
However, it was not until 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving to fall on the last Thursday of November, that the modern holiday was celebrated nationally. 
With a few deviations, Lincoln's precedent was followed annually by every subsequent president--until 1939. In 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt departed from tradition by declaring November 23, the next to last Thursday that year, as Thanksgiving Day. Considerable controversy surrounded this deviation, and some Americans refused to honor Roosevelt's declaration.
For the next two years, Roosevelt repeated the unpopular proclamation, but on November 26, 1941, he admitted his mistake and signed a bill into law officially making the fourth Thursday in November the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day.
In my case, I did not know a thing about Thanksgiving when our family settled in Wisconsin in the fall of 1964.  I began to detect that something was coming when the kids in school started putting "turkey posters" about the upcoming holiday.  

Finally, Miss Jones, that wonderful 6th-grade teacher I was blessed with, sat me down and explained the story, from the ship crossing the ocean, to the landing at Plymouth Rock, to the terrible first winter and eventually a day to say thanks for everything.

It did not take long for me to get into the Thanksgiving mood.  

Today, it's my favorite American holiday for two reasons:

1) It demonstrates the role of faith in the early days of what would become the United States.

2) It confirms that this land was settled by self-reliant people who faced adversity and grew stronger.

As I told a friend years ago, you cannot understand American exceptionalism unless you get familiar with the Thanksgiving story. 

P.S. You can hear CANTO TALK here & follow me on Twitter @ scantojr.


Monday, November 22, 2010

President Kennedy: It happened in 1963!

     
Back in 2013, Dallas remembered the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination.  We had large crowds, parades, speeches and personal recollections of that awful day when Lee Harvey Oswald killed President Kennedy.

It was probably the last big remembrance of the assassination in Dallas.   I'm not saying that people will forget what happened in Dallas.   What I'm saying is that more and more people will remember it as a historical footnote rather than something that they lived through.   It happened in 1963 after all.  Most people today have no personal recollection of that day.

On the morning that President Lincoln died, someone said that "now he belongs to ages".  Today, we say that President Kennedy now belongs to historians.  They will analyze his brief presidency and speculate about what would have happened if he had survived or not killed that day.

Would Vietnam have been different?   Would President Kennedy had passed the civil rights legislation that President Johnson successfully completed?   Would VP Johnson have been on the 1964 reelection ticket?  

Historians will take it from here because there are less and less people who remember what they were doing when they got the news that President Kennedy was killed in Dallas.

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.  If you like our posts, drop a dime here.
 



A communist shot JFK in Dallas

As a kid in Cuba, I sat with my father and watched Fidel Castro on Cuban TV talk about the Kennedy assassination.  I don't remember what he said but my dad told me later that Castro was very nervous.  I guess that he felt that President Johnson would use the assassination to correct the mistake of The Bay of Pigs.  A few days later, I heard my father and some of his friends say the same thing over a little Cuban coffee and cigars.   

It was a very tense time in Cuba because the Castro regime was locking up dissidents, such as my father's cousin Dr. Ignacio Segurola who spent 14 years in prison without a trial.   My mother told me recently that she was afraid that my own father would be picked up because he refused to take a job with the newly created national bank that replaced all of the privately owned banks expropriated (or as they say "nationalized") during that time.

Over time, I've heard all of the conspiracy theories, watched a few documentaries and even that idiotic Oliver Stone JFK movie that came out in 1991.   

Can we finally call it?  President JFK was killed by a crazy guy who was hanging around with communists and supporting the Castro dictatorship in Cuba.

Yes, there were angry right-wingers in Dallas.  Some of them behaved poorly.  However, do you think that one of these groups would have "contracted" a head case like Oswald to kill anybody?.  My guess is that most of these right wing groups would have given Oswald a bloody lip for his communist ideas if they ever had a chance to run into him. 

A few years ago, James Piereson put the nail in all of the conspiracies, especially the nonsense that right wingers in Dallas or the "let's get into Vietnam" military industrial complex.

Mr Piereson tells us about Oswald, the communist who killed the president of the US:
"The facts are that President Kennedy was a martyr in the Cold War struggle against communism. The assassin was a communist and not a bigot or a right-winger. Oswald defected from the U.S. to the Soviet Union in 1959, vowing when he did so that he could no longer live under a capitalist system. He returned to the U.S. with his Russian wife in 1962, disappointed with life under Soviet communism but without giving up his Marxist beliefs or his hatred of the U.S. By 1963, Oswald had transferred his political allegiance to Castro's communist regime in Cuba.  

In April 1963, Oswald attempted to shoot Edwin Walker, a retired U.S. Army general, as he sat at a desk in his dining room. Walker was the head of the Dallas chapter of the John Birch Society and a figure then in the news because of his opposition to school integration and his demand that the Castro regime be overthrown. The rifle Oswald used in the attempt at Walker's life was the one he used to shoot Kennedy.  

Dallas police would not identify Oswald as Walker's would-be assassin until after the assassination of Kennedy, but Oswald, fearful that he would be identified for the Walker shooting, fled Dallas for New Orleans. 

In June 1963 he established a local chapter of Fair Play for Cuba, a national organization dedicated to gaining diplomatic recognition for Castro's regime. Oswald was filmed by a local television station in New Orleans circulating leaflets on behalf of the Castro government and was jailed briefly following a street altercation with anti-Castro Cubans. Soon thereafter he appeared on a local television program to debate U.S. policy toward Cuba.  

In late September, Oswald left New Orleans to travel to Mexico City in pursuit of a visa that would permit him to travel to Cuba and then to the Soviet Union. As documented in the Warren Commission Report, he took along a dossier of news clippings on his pro-Castro activities to establish his revolutionary bona fides with personnel at the Cuban and Soviet embassies in the city. 

Oswald returned to Dallas empty-handed after being told that his application would take months to process. He was still waiting on his application six weeks later when he read that President Kennedy's forthcoming visit to Texas would include a motorcade through downtown Dallas and past the building where he worked.  

The assassin's motives for shooting Kennedy were undoubtedly linked to a wish to interfere with the president's campaign to overthrow Castro's government. After the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy pledged to abandon efforts to overthrow Castro's regime by force. But the war of words between the two governments continued, and so did clandestine plots by the Kennedy administration to eliminate Castro by assassination."
Last, but not least, I have spoken to Cubans living in New Orleans in 1962-63 who got into heated arguments with Oswald over Cuba.  They will attest to the fact that Oswald was a "Castro loving communist," or exactly the kind of jerk who would kill the president of the US.

The right did not kill JFK.  The bloody communist did!

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

1963: President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas


As a kid in Cuba, I sat with my father and watched Fidel Castro on Cuban TV talk about the Kennedy assassination.  I don't remember what he said but my dad told me later that Castro was very nervous.  I guess that he felt that President Johnson would use the assassination to correct the mistake of The Bay of Pigs.  A few days later, I heard my father and some of his friends say the same thing over a little Cuban coffee and cigars.   

It was a very tense time in Cuba because the Castro regime was locking up dissidents, such as my father's cousin Dr. Ignacio Segurola who spent 14 years in prison without a trial.   My mother told me recently that she was afraid that my own father would be picked up because he refused to take a job with the newly created national bank that replaced all of the privately owned banks expropriated (or as they say "nationalized") during that time.

Over time, I've heard all of the conspiracy theories, watched a few documentaries and even that idiotic Oliver Stone JFK movie that came out in 1991.   

Can we finally call it?  President JFK was killed by a crazy guy who was hanging around with communists and supporting the Castro dictatorship in Cuba.

Yes, there were angry right-wingers in Dallas.  Some of them behaved poorly.  However, do you think that one of these groups would have "contracted" a head case like Oswald to kill anybody?.  My guess is that most of these right wing groups would have given Oswald a bloody lip for his communist ideas if they ever had a chance to run into him. 

A few years ago, James Piereson put the nail in all of the conspiracies, especially the nonsense that right wingers in Dallas or the "let's get into Vietnam" military industrial complex.

Mr Piereson tells us about Oswald, the communist who killed the president of the US:
"The facts are that President Kennedy was a martyr in the Cold War struggle against communism. The assassin was a communist and not a bigot or a right-winger. Oswald defected from the U.S. to the Soviet Union in 1959, vowing when he did so that he could no longer live under a capitalist system. He returned to the U.S. with his Russian wife in 1962, disappointed with life under Soviet communism but without giving up his Marxist beliefs or his hatred of the U.S. By 1963, Oswald had transferred his political allegiance to Castro's communist regime in Cuba.  

In April 1963, Oswald attempted to shoot Edwin Walker, a retired U.S. Army general, as he sat at a desk in his dining room. Walker was the head of the Dallas chapter of the John Birch Society and a figure then in the news because of his opposition to school integration and his demand that the Castro regime be overthrown. The rifle Oswald used in the attempt at Walker's life was the one he used to shoot Kennedy.  

Dallas police would not identify Oswald as Walker's would-be assassin until after the assassination of Kennedy, but Oswald, fearful that he would be identified for the Walker shooting, fled Dallas for New Orleans. 

In June 1963 he established a local chapter of Fair Play for Cuba, a national organization dedicated to gaining diplomatic recognition for Castro's regime. Oswald was filmed by a local television station in New Orleans circulating leaflets on behalf of the Castro government and was jailed briefly following a street altercation with anti-Castro Cubans. Soon thereafter he appeared on a local television program to debate U.S. policy toward Cuba.  

In late September, Oswald left New Orleans to travel to Mexico City in pursuit of a visa that would permit him to travel to Cuba and then to the Soviet Union. As documented in the Warren Commission Report, he took along a dossier of news clippings on his pro-Castro activities to establish his revolutionary bona fides with personnel at the Cuban and Soviet embassies in the city. 

Oswald returned to Dallas empty-handed after being told that his application would take months to process. He was still waiting on his application six weeks later when he read that President Kennedy's forthcoming visit to Texas would include a motorcade through downtown Dallas and past the building where he worked.  

The assassin's motives for shooting Kennedy were undoubtedly linked to a wish to interfere with the president's campaign to overthrow Castro's government. After the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy pledged to abandon efforts to overthrow Castro's regime by force. But the war of words between the two governments continued, and so did clandestine plots by the Kennedy administration to eliminate Castro by assassination."
Last, but not least, I have spoken to Cubans living in New Orleans in 1962-63 who got into heated arguments with Oswald over Cuba.  They will attest to the fact that Oswald was a "Castro loving communist," or exactly the kind of jerk who would kill the president of the US.

The right did not kill JFK.  The bloody communist did!

P.S.  You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

Friday, November 19, 2010

Songs named after days of the week

Image result for jukebox imagesWhat's your favorite song named after a day of the week?   Is it Chicago's "Saturday in the park"?   Or The Mamas and Papas' "Monday Monday"?    

According to this great article, Sunday and Saturday have inspired more song titles than any other days.   Thursday is the least popular.    Only "Sweet Thursday" by Johny Mathis has hit the charts.

Here is the full article:

1. Sunday (30 songs)

“Sunday Barbecue,” Tennessee Ernie Ford, 1958
“Never on Sunday,” Don Costa and His Orchestra and Chorus, 1960
“A Sunday Kind of Love,” Jan & Dean, 1962
“Sunday and Me,” Jay & The Americans, 1965
“Sunday for Tea,” Peter and Gordon, 1967
“Sunday Will Never Be the Same,” Spanky and Our Gang, 1967
“Pleasant Valley Sunday,” The Monkees, 1967
“Sunday Mornin’,” Spanky and Our Gang, 1968
“(The Puppet Song) Whiskey on a Sunday,” The Irish Rovers, 1968
“Sunday Sun,” Neil Diamond, 1968
“Will You Be Staying After Sunday,” The Peppermint Rainbow, 1969
“Sunday,” The Moments, 1969
“Sugar on Sunday,” The Clique, 1969
“Sunday Mornin’ Comin’ Down,” Ray Stevens, 1969
“(One of These Days) Sunday’s Gonna’ Come on Tuesday,” The New Establishment, 1969
“Sunday Mornin’,” Oliver, 1969
“Sunday Morning Coming Down,” Johnny Cash, 1970
“What Are You Doing Sunday,” Dawn feat. Tony Orlando, 1971
“Beautiful Sunday,” Daniel Boone, 1972
“Sunday Morning Sunshine,” Harry Chapin, 1972
“Another Park, Another Sunday,” The Doobie Brothers, 1974
“Like a Sunday Morning,” Lana Cantrell, 1975
“Sunday Sunrise,” Anne Murray, 1975
“Like a Sunday in Salem (The Amos & Andy Song),” Gene Cotton, 1978
“Saturday Night, Sunday Morning,” Thelma Houston, 1979
“On a Sunday Afternoon,” Lighter Shade of Brown, 1991
“Sunday Morning,” Earth, Wind & Fire, 1993
“Raining on Sunday,” Lighter Shade of Brown, 2003
“That’s What I Love About Sunday,” Craig Morgan, 2005
“Sunday Morning,” Maroon 5, 2005

2. Saturday (23 songs)

“Lonely Saturday Night,” Don French, 1959
“Jukebox Saturday Night,” Nino and the Ebb Tides, 1961
“Another Saturday Night,” Sam Cooke, 1963
“Saturday Night at the Movies,” The Drifters, 1964
“I’ve Got Five Dollars and It’s Saturday Night,” George Jones and Gene Pitney, 1965
“On a Saturday Night,” Eddie Floyd, 1967
“Saturday Night at the World,” Mason Williams, 1969
“Come Saturday Morning,” The Sandpipers, 1969
“Saturday Morning Confusion,” Bobby Russell, 1971
“Saturday in the Park,” Chicago, 1972
“Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting,” Elton John, 1973
“Dancin’ (On a Saturday Night),” Flash Cadillac & The Continental Kids, 1974
“Saturday Night Special,” Lynyrd Skynyrd, 1975
“Saturday Night,” Bay City Rollers, 1975
“Almost Saturday Night,” John Fogerty, 1975
“Saturday Nite,” Earth, Wind & Fire, 1977
“Livingston Saturday Night,” Jimmy Buffet, 1978
“Saturday Night, Sunday Morning,” Thelma Houston, 1979
“Saturday Night,” Herman Brood, 1979
“Saturday Love,” Cherelle feat. Alexander O’Neal, 1986
“Saturday (Oooh! Ooooh!),” Ludacris, 2002
“American Saturday Night,” Brad Paisley, 2009
“Saturday,” Rebecca Black, 2013

3. Monday (13 songs)

“Fell in Love on Monday,” Fats Domino, 1961
“Stormy Monday Blues,” Bobby “Blue” Bland, 1962
“Monday, Monday,” The Mamas & The Papas, 1966
“Rainy Days and Mondays,” The Carpenters, 1971
“Come Monday,” Jimmy Buffet, 1974
“If You’re Not Back on Love by Monday,” Millie Jackson, 1977
“I Don’t Like Mondays,” The Boomtown Rats, 1980
“New Moon on Monday,” Duran Duran, 1984
“Manic Monday,” The Bangles. 1986
“Blue Monday 1988,” New Order, 1988
“Blue Monday,” Orgy, 1999
“I Don’t Have to Be Me (‘Til Monday),” Steve Azar, 2002
“Monday Morning Church,” Alan Jackson, 2004

4. Friday (11 songs)

“Friday’s Child,” Nancy Sinatra, 1966
“Friday on My Mind,” Easybeats, 1967
“Black Friday,” Steely Dan, 1975
“Thank God It’s Friday,” Love & Kisses, 1978
“Livin’ It Up (Friday Night),” Bell and James, 1979
“Friday I’m in Love,” The Cure, 1992
“Keep Their Heads Ringin’ (From Friday),” Dr. Dre, 1995
“Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.),” Katy Perry, 2010
“Friday,” Rebecca Black, 2011
“Last Friday Night,” Glee Cast, 2011
“Friday Night,” Eric Paslay, 2013

5. Tuesday (5 songs)

“Ruby Tuesday,” The Rolling Stones, 1967
“Tuesday Afternoon (Forever Afternoon),” The Moody Blues, 1968
“(One of These Days) Sunday’s Gonna’ Come on Tuesday,” The New Establishment, 1969
“Everything’s Tuesday,” Chairman of the Board, 1970
“Tuesday,” iLoveMakonnen feat. Drake, 2014

6. Wednesday (2 songs)

“Wednesday,” The Royal Guardsmen, 1967
“Waiting for Wednesday,” Lisa Loeb & Nine Stories, 1996

7. Thursday (1 song)

“Sweet Thursday,” Johnny Mathis, 1962
To say the least, this is great stuff the next time you play Trivial Pursuits!

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