Saturday, May 21, 2022

Title 42 plus Speaker Pelosi and the Bishop and What did Hillary know?


Title 42.....Speaker Pelosi and the Bishop.....What did Hillary know? .........1927 Lindbergh lands in Paris........and other stories.....
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Saturday's video: Title 42.....Speaker Pelosi and the Bishop.....What did Hillary know?......


Saturday's video: 
Title 42.....Speaker Pelosi and the Bishop.....What did Hillary know?......

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Maybe the Secretary should talk to the people in the Interior


 (My new American Thinker post)

First, she shows no emotion about rising gasoline prices.  One would think that she would have prepared for such an obvious question.  In other words, I would have expected her to say 1,000 times that she feels the pain at the pump.  No, she responded with aloof answers about a "balanced approach" whatever that means.  I would think that most Americans would love an approach that tilts a bit in their direction, i.e. a drop in gas prices.

Second, she was confused when asked about the environmental impact of drilling there rather than here:

“Is it more environmentally friendly to develop and produce oil and gas” in the U.S. or in foreign countries, like Venezuela? 

Biden Interior Secretary: “I’m not an economist”

Thank God that she was not asked to define "woman."  

Miss Haaland is running the Department of Interior but does not have a clue of what people are experiencing in the interior or anywhere else.  How can any fair-minded person watch this and conclude that the Biden administration is connected to reality?   

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We remember May 21






We remember May 21:

"The spirit of St. Louis":    We remember that Charles Lindbergh landed in Paris in 1927.     His plane "The spirit of St. Louis" had taken off from Roosevelt Field 33 hours earlier.

"Perry Mason":  We remember Raymond Burr, known to most of us as Perry Mason.  He was born on this day in 1917 and died in 1993.    

Rock history:   On this day in 1955, Chuck Berry recorded "Maybellene" and the rest is history.   Berry went on to have many more hits.   He also influenced The Beatles and The Rolling Stones of the next generation of rock.    It all started for Berry with the wonderful "Maybellene".

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1927: Charles Lindbergh arrived in Paris


Image result for charles lindbergh paris 1927 images
We remember that Charles Lindbergh landed in Paris in 1927.     His plane "The spirit of St. Louis" had taken off from Roosevelt Field 33 hours earlier.

As a result of the flight, Lindbergh became an international personality and met his future wife during a trip to Mexico.     He died in 1974.


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The first Atlantic crossing by plane: Still amazing to think about


(My new American Thinker post)

Jimmy Stewart's The Spirit of St. Louis is a great movie, especially thanks to the scenes of Charles Lindbergh trying to stay awake over the Atlantic Ocean.

On May 21 in 1927, Charles Lindbergh did something that had never been done before:
At 7:52 a.m. EST on May 20, The Spirit of St. Louis lifted off from Roosevelt Field, so loaded with fuel that it barely cleared the telephone wires at the end of the runway. Lindbergh traveled northeast up the coast. After only four hours, he felt tired and flew within 10 feet of the water to keep his mind clear. As night fell, the aircraft left the coast of Newfoundland and set off across the Atlantic.
At about 2 a.m. on May 21, Lindbergh passed the halfway mark, and an hour later dawn came. Soon after, The Spirit of St. Louis entered a fog, and Lindbergh struggled to stay awake, holding his eyelids open with his fingers and hallucinating that ghosts were passing through the cockpit.
After 24 hours in the air, he felt a little more awake and spotted fishing boats in the water. 
At about 11 a.m. (3 p.m. local time), he saw the coast of Ireland. Despite using only rudimentary navigation, he was two hours ahead of schedule and only three miles off course. He flew past England and by 3 p.m. EST was flying over France. It was 8 p.m. in France, and night was falling.
At the Le Bourget Aerodrome in Paris, tens of thousands of Saturday night revelers had gathered to await Lindbergh’s arrival.
At 10:24 a.m. local time, his gray and white monoplane slipped out of the darkness and made a perfect landing in the air field. The crowd surged on 
The Spirit of St. Louis, and Lindbergh, weary from his 33 1/2-hour, 3,600-mile journey, was cheered and lifted above their heads. He hadn’t slept for 55 hours. Two French aviators saved Lindbergh from the boisterous crowd, whisking him away in an automobile. He was an immediate international celebrity.
The best part of Lindbergh's odyssey is how incredible it was.  It was a test not just of a machine, but of the human body and mind.  In other words, the flight could have ended if Lindbergh had not stayed awake.  He could have crashed and drowned from the lack of sleep.   

Lindbergh said this about sitting in that small cabin with nothing but his eyes and good instincts to get him to his destination:
While my hand is on the stick, my feet on the rudder, and my eyes on the compass, this consciousness, like a winged messenger, goes out to visit the waves below, testing the warmth of water, the speed of wind, the thickness of intervening clouds. It goes north to the glacial coasts of Greenland, over the horizon to the edge of dawn, ahead to Ireland, England, and the continent of Europe, away through space to the moon and stars, always returning, unwillingly, to the mortal duty of seeing that the limbs and muscles have attended their routine while it was gone.
Lindbergh died in 1974.  Wonder what he thought when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon five years before!

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We remember Raymond Burr (1917-1993)




Image result for raymond burr images
We remember Raymond Burr, known to most of us as Perry Mason.  He was born on this day in 1917 and died in 1993.    

Back in 1956,  Burr was in Cuba working on “Affair in Havana“.     Burr played “Mal Mallabee”, a rich businessman confined to a wheelchair as the result of a boating accident.  Mallabee hired an investigator to look into his wife Lorna (Sara Shane) who is allegedly having an affair with Nick Douglas, an American living and working in Cuba played by John Cassavetes.   
Catch “Affair in Havana” the next time it’s shown on the retro channels.   I won’t tell you more about the plot. 
The movie will take you back to a time when Americans worked and invested in Cuba without fear of confiscation, totally functional pre-Castro Cuba.
After that movie, Burr applied for the role of “Perry Mason” .   He won the audition and started that show later in 1957 and it became one of the most popular TV series ever. 
I recall my late father saying that he saw the show in pre-Castro Cuba.  I remember watching the show in Mexico overdubbed in Spanish.

Burr had another popular series called “Ironside”.   It was good but I think most of us remember him for those Perry Mason shows.
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1955: Chuck Berry and the story of "Maybellene"

On this day in 1955, Chuck Berry recorded "Maybellene" and the rest is history.        

Chuck Berry has a very special place in the history of rock.  He is one of the legendary composers and guitarists.     Where would rock be without Chuck Berry?

Berry went on to have many more hits.   He also influenced The Beatles and The Rolling Stones of the next generation of rock.

It all started for Berry with the wonderful "Maybellene".


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