Friday, February 03, 2017

February 3, 1959: The day "the music died"



In 1972, Don McClean introduced our generation to Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper in "American Pie":
"A long, long time ago...I can still rememberHow that music used to make me smile.And I knew if I had my chanceThat I could make those people danceAnd, maybe, they'd be happy for a while.But February made me shiverWith every paper I'd deliver.Bad news on the doorstep;I couldn't take one more step.I can't remember if I criedWhen I read about his widowed bride,But something touched me deep insideThe day the music died."
The "day the music died" was years ago, a big triple loss for pop music. 

McClean's tune got me very interested in Buddy Holly, a native of West Texas.

I bought his records. I visited his grave during a business trip to West Texas about 20 years ago. I have followed the creation of The Buddy Holly Center in Lubbock, TX.

I wrote a post last year: Remembering Buddy Holly!

I learned that Paul McCartney was also a huge fan of Buddy Holly. He toured England in 1958!

The Beatles recorded Holly's "Words of Love" in one of their early LPs. The Rolling Stones recorded "Not fade away", another of Holly's songs.

Buddy Holly was only 22 but ".....In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked Holly #13 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time."

You can hear Buddy Holly's influence in every rock song recorded in the last 50 years. You can specially hear it in garage bands or every 15-year old who has played a rock guitar.

Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper were killed in the same plane crash. They were not as popular as Holly but Valens had incredible potential since he was only 17!

The day "the music died", a sad day in the history of rock.






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