Thursday, June 22, 2017

A look at US-Mexico issues with Allan Wall




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Whatever happened to Bob Lind?



Bob Lind wrote "Elusive Butterfly", one of the greatest songs of the 1960's.

And then he did not record any other hits!

I understand from his website that his songs were recorded by other artists. Frankly, I am not familiar with them.

Whatever happened to Bob Lind? Is he the all time "one hit wonder"?

Elusive Butterfly
(written by Bob Lind)

You might wake up some mornin'
To the sound of something moving
past your window in the wind
And if you're quick enough to rise
You'll catch a fleeting glimpse of someone's fading shadow
Out on the new horizon
You may see the floating motion of a distant pair of wings
And if the sleep has left your ears
You might hear footsteps running through an open meadow
Don't be concerned,
it will not harm you
It's only me pursuing somethin' I'm not sure of
Across my dreams with nets of wonder
I chase the bright elusive butterfly of love
You might have heard my footsteps
Echo softly in the distance through the canyons of your mind
I might have even called your name
As I ran searching after something to believe in
You might have seen me runnin'
Through the long-abandoned
ruins of the dreams you left behind
If you remember something there
That glided past you followed close by heavy breathin'
Don't be concerned, it will not harm you
It's only me pursuing somethin'
I'm not sure of
Across my dreams with nets of wonder
I chase the bright elusive butterfly of love

Across my dreams with nets of wonder
I chase the bright elusive butterfly of love"


Pretty good song!






"Sons of", a wonderful song by Judy Collins



We file this one under the "time flies" category.

Judy Collins is 70-something these days.....Is that possible? Yes it is!

Over the years, we've loved Judy Collins' songs and beautiful voice.

Her biggest hits were "Both Sides Now" and "Send In The Clowns".

She also recorded one of the best versions of "Amazing Grace".

She won the Grammy Award (Best Folk Performance or Folk Recording) for "Both Sides Now" in 1968.

It's hard to pick favorite but I always loved "Sons of":

"Sons of the sea, sons of the saint
Who is the child with no complaint;
Sons of the great or sons unknown
All were children like your own

The same sweet smiles, the same sad tears
The cries at night, the nightmare fears
Sons of the great, sons unknown
All were children like your own

Sons of tycoons, or sons from the farms
All of the children ran from your arms
Through fields of gold, through fields of ruin
All of the children vanished too soon

In towering waves, in walls of flesh
Amid dying birds trembling with death
Sons of tycoons, sons from the farms
All of the children ran from your arms

Sons of your sons, sons passing by
Children were lost in lullaby
Sons of true love, sons of regret
All of your sons you can never forget

Some build the roads, some wrote the poems
Some went to war, some never came home
Sons of your sons, sons passing by
Children were lost in lullaby...."






June 1970: The last # 1 by The Beatles


was # 1 this week in June 1970.........the last 45 released by The Beatles.....also featured on on the LP "Let it be"........we didn't know back then that a "naked version" would be available years later......or a recording without Phil Spector's orchestral arrangement.....frankly I like the "naked version" a lot more........




THE BEATLES

The Long And Winding Road

"The long and winding road that leads to your door
Will never disappear

I've seen that road before it always leads me here

Leads me to your door

The wild and windy night that the rain washed away

Has left a pool of tears crying for the day

Why leave me standing here, let me know the way

Many times I've been alone and many times I've cried
Anyway you'll never know the many ways I've tried
And still they lead me back to the long and winding road
You left me standing here a long, long time ago
Don't leave me waiting here, lead me to you door
But still they lead me back to the long and winding road
You left me standing here a long, long time ago
Don't keep me waiting here (Don't keep me wait), lead me to you door
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah...."

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We remember Erich Maria Remarque (1898-1970)



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We remember Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906-2001)



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We remember Pete “Pistol” Maravich (1947-88)



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We remember Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906-2001)



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Maybe it’s time to send the pollsters and Dems back to school




Many years ago, my first boss was a tough guy. He sort of reminded me of a stern defensive coordinator in the face of an NFL player who blew his assignment. His favorite line, and I heard it a few times, was: “Mr. Canto, I think that I’m sending you back to school…”
I never got sent back to school but he made his point. He expected results.     
Maybe it’s time to send the pollsters and the Democrats back to school. To say the least, it’s been a tough year for the party and pollsters.     
For a month, many of us heard that the Georgia special election was too close to call. The RCP average showed a very close race with the Democrat leading in most of the polls. He led by 7 at one point and was 1-2 points ahead until Karen Handel went up by 1 in the last poll.   
To say the least, most of us tuned in expecting to be up all night waiting the results in what was referred to as “a referendum on President Trump.”
Then, everything started to change. As the numbers came, Handel started to build a lead. By 10 PM central time, Mrs. Handel was delivering a victory speech and Mr. Ossoff was desperately putting a happy face on a disaster.
So what happened?     
To be fair, it’s tough to “poll” a district, as a couple of my pollster friends told me over the years.   
Nevertheless, they were wrong again. In fact, 53-47% is better than Mr. Trump’s numbers last November.     
I think that there are several things going on here:     
1)  The modern Democrat Party is so out of touch with reality that it’s frightening, as Barry Casselman wrote in his analysis of the election. How do you nominate a young liberal without any political experience to run in a conservative district? Also, don’t compound your stupidity by finding a guy who does not even live in the district. The party is in deep trouble if they think this is the way to compete in these so called red districts.    
2)  The Democrat candidate was funded by people who thought that they could win by just spending money. Yes, money is important but knocking on doors and presenting positions is more important than speaking in pathetic generalities like the Democrat did. It’s great to say that you want affordable health care for all but voters in these districts would rather hear how you’re going to pay for it.   
3)  Hating Trump will get you those who hate Trump but not much more. The Democrats need a message beyond Trump, as Frank Bruni wrote:  
So a party sorely demoralized in November is demoralized yet again — and left to wonder if the intense anti-Trump passion visible in protests, marches, money and new volunteers isn’t just some theatrical, symbolic, abstract thing.
Yes, maybe they are screaming, protesting, and marching too much. It does get a little boring, and more important, counterproductive over time!
So here we are and this movie has a familiar ending: The Dems win polls and the GOP wins elections.
Maybe we need to send Democrats and pollsters back to school, as my old boss used to say.
P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk), (YouTube) and follow me on Twitter.



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We remember Carl Hubbell 1903-1988

We remember one of the great lefties in major league history.

Carl Hubbell was born in Carthage, Missouri on this day in 1903.    Carl broke with the Giants in 1928 and started 14 games.

He turned into one of the game's greatest pitchers always playing with the New York Giants:  253-164, 2.98 ERA & 260 complete games.   In other words, he completed more games than he won, a rather rare accomplishment.  

Hubbell pitched a no-hitter in 1929.   Hubbell won 24 consecutive games between 1936 (16) and 1937 (8), the longest such streak in Major League history.

He is also remembered for his 1934 All Star game performance:   he struck out Hall of Famers Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin consecutively. 

He was inducted into The Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.


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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

The Georgia election aftermath and other stories of the day




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70% chance that Nate Silver gets the next one wrong



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1788: U.S. Constitution ratified



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Fake polls?



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Happy # 73 Ray Davies



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1940: Richard Nixon & Patricia Ryan were married



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The Georgia election aftermath plus other stories




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Let California become our ‘single-payer’ test case


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The ObamaCare repeal debate goes on. We may have a U.S. Senate plan coming out in the next couple of weeks.      
ObamaCare’s implosion is also moving forward: “Iowa’s Last Obamacare Insurer Asks For 43% Rate Increase For 2018”! Wasn’t this thing called the Affordable Health Care Act?
The “single-payer” chorus is also singing 24/7. They argue that a “single-payer” program would be good for all concerned or put us on the right side of history as they love to say.
Here is an idea. Let California become our “single-payer” test case. It is the only place in the U.S. where there are enough Democrats to pass it or not a single GOP vote that could stop it.    
Why not let Governor Brown, Senator Harris, and the rest of California lead the way and prove to us that it is the way of the future. 
According to an editorial in the Washington Post, the idea of universal care may turn out to be another one of those liberal dreams that always die when you calculate the potential costs. This is from the editorial:     
The single-payer model has some strong advantages. It is much simpler for most people — no more insurance forms or related hassles. Employers would no longer be mixed up in providing health-care benefits, and taxpayers would no longer subsidize that form of private compensation. Government experts could conduct research on treatments and use that information to directly cut costs across the system.
But the government’s price tag would be astonishing. When Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) proposed a “Medicare for all” health plan in his presidential campaign, the nonpartisan Urban Institute figured that it would raise government spending by $32 trillion over 10 years, requiring a tax increase so huge that even the democratic socialist Mr. Sanders did not propose anything close to it.
The advocates of public health care always chastise private insurance companies and the “profit motive”. They overlook that public health care is not cheap at all, as the editorial goes on to say:   
The public piece of the American health-care system has not proven itself to be particularly cost-efficient. 
On a per capita basis, U.S. government health programs alone spend more than Canada, Australia, France, and Britain each do on their entire health systems. 
That means the U.S. government spends more per American to cover a slice of the population than other governments spend per citizen to cover all of theirs. 
Simply expanding Medicare to all would not automatically result in a radically more efficient health-care system. Something else would have to change.
Also, single-payer means very high taxes, certainly a lot higher than what President Obama (18%) and millionaire Senator Bernie Sanders paid in 2016. Ask a Canadian friend about their income taxes!
My idea will never happen because even California knows that it can’t afford a single-payer program. Or, John Myers wrote recently:  
Almost two of every three Californians in a new statewide poll said they like the idea of a single-payer, government healthcare system, but far fewer support the idea if it includes a tax increase.
We will probably never see universal health care in the U.S. The good news is that the numbers just don’t add up. The bad news is that we will have to hear about it in every election cycle. 
P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk), (YouTube) and follow me on Twitter.

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Remembering the sounds of "Mr Tambourine Man"


On this day in 1965, The Byrds' unique guitars and Bob Dylan's music came together and the result was 'Mr Tambourine Man", one of the most interesting songs of the decade:

"Released on this day in 1965, the Byrds' debut album, Mr. Tambourine Man, marked the beginning of the folk-rock revolution. 
In just a few months, the Byrds had become a household name, with a #1 single and a smash-hit album that married the ringing guitars and backbeat of the British Invasion with the harmonies and lyrical depth of folk to create an entirely new sound.

Perhaps someone else could have listened to the bright guitar lines of the Beatles' "Ticket To Ride" and to Bob Dylan's original "Mr. Tambourine Man" and had the idea of somehow combining the two, but neither of those recordings existed when the Byrds' Roger McGuinn devised his group's new sound. Newly signed to Columbia Records, the Byrds had access to an early demo version of "Mr. Tambourine Man" even before their label-mate Bob Dylan had had a chance to record it for his own upcoming album. On January 20, 1965, they entered the studio to record what would become the title track of their debut album and, incidentally, the only Bob Dylan song ever to reach #1 on the U.S. pop charts. Aiming consciously for a vocal style in between Dylan's and Lennon's, McGuinn sang lead, with Gene Clark and David Crosby providing the complex harmony that would, along with McGuinn's jangly electric 12-string Rickenbacker guitar, form the basis of the Byrds' trademark sound.

That sound, which would influence countless groups from Big Star to the Bangles in decades to come, had an immediate and profound impact on the Byrds' contemporaries, and even on the artists who'd inspired it in the first place. "Wow, man, you can even dance to that!" was Bob Dylan's reaction to hearing what the Byrds' had done with "Mr. Tambourine Man." 
Just days before the hugely influential album of the same name was released to the public on June 21, 1965, Dylan himself would be in a New York recording studio with an electric guitar in his hands, putting the finishing touches on "Like A Rolling Stone" and setting the stage for his controversial "Dylan goes electric" performance at the Newport Folk Festival just one month later." 
Click here for The Byrds and "Mr Tambourine Man":

"Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I'm not sleepy and there ain't no place I'm goin' to
Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning, I'll come following' you

Take me for a trip upon your magic swirlin' ship
All my senses have been stripped
And my hands can't feel to grip
And my toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wandering'

I'm ready to go anywhere I'm ready for to fade
On to my own parade cast your dancin' spell my way
I promise to go under it

Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I'm not sleepy and there ain't no place I'm goin' to
Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning, I'll come following' you....."

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Had not heard "12:30" in a long time!



The Mamas and Papas were a very popular quartet many summers ago.


From left to right: Denny Doherty, Cass Elliott, a.k.a. Mama Cass, Michelle and John Phillips, the tall one with the hat! (Michelle is the only surviving member of the group. Cass died accidentally. Denny and John died of cancer recently!)


John Phillips wrote most of their big songs. They had hits like "California Dreamin" and "Monday Monday".


However, my favorite was always "12:30":


"I used to live in New York City
Every thing there was dark and dirty
Outside my window was a steeple 
With a clock that always said 12:30
Young girls are coming to the canyon
And in the morning I can see them walking
I can no longer keep my blinds drawn 
And I cant keep myself from talking.
At first so strange to feel so friendly 
To say good morning and really mean it
To feel these changes happening in me 
But not to notice till I feel it.
Young girls are coming to the canyon 
And in the morning I can see them walking
I can no longer keep my blinds drawn 
And I cant keep myself from talking.
Cloudy waters cast no reflection 
Images of beauty lie there stagnant
Vibrations bounce in no direction 
And lie there shattered into fragments.
Young girls are coming to the canyon 
And in the morning I can see them walking
I can no longer keep my blinds drawn
And I cant keep myself from talking."


February 3, 1959: The day "the music died"



In 1972, Don McClean introduced our generation to Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper in "American Pie":
"A long, long time ago...I can still rememberHow that music used to make me smile.And I knew if I had my chanceThat I could make those people danceAnd, maybe, they'd be happy for a while.But February made me shiverWith every paper I'd deliver.Bad news on the doorstep;I couldn't take one more step.I can't remember if I criedWhen I read about his widowed bride,But something touched me deep insideThe day the music died."
The "day the music died" was years ago, a big triple loss for pop music. 

McClean's tune got me very interested in Buddy Holly, a native of West Texas.

I bought his records. I visited his grave during a business trip to West Texas about 20 years ago. I have followed the creation of The Buddy Holly Center in Lubbock, TX.

I wrote a post last year: Remembering Buddy Holly!

I learned that Paul McCartney was also a huge fan of Buddy Holly. He toured England in 1958!

The Beatles recorded Holly's "Words of Love" in one of their early LPs. The Rolling Stones recorded "Not fade away", another of Holly's songs.

Buddy Holly was only 22 but ".....In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked Holly #13 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time."

You can hear Buddy Holly's influence in every rock song recorded in the last 50 years. You can specially hear it in garage bands or every 15-year old who has played a rock guitar.

Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper were killed in the same plane crash. They were not as popular as Holly but Valens had incredible potential since he was only 17!

The day "the music died", a sad day in the history of rock.






November 1972: "Alive" by The Bee Gees



By November 1972, The Bee Gees were enjoying another year of international hits, such as "Run to me" and "My world". It was a pretty good time for Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb!

They released one of their very best albums, or CDs as they called them now: To Whom it may concern!

It included "We lost the road", "Sea of smiling faces" and Maurice Gibb's lead vocal on "You know it's for you"!

The second single from the album was "Alive", a Barry Gibb lead vocal. Of course, this is 5 years before "Stayin' Alive", the legendary tune that opened the movie "Saturday Night Fever:



Remembering ABBA!



They were from Sweden. You don't usually associate Sweden with English pop music.

Yet, ABBA was one of the best selling artists of the 1970's.

ABBA were two guys and two gorgeous girls, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Agnetha Fältskog.

Who cares about the two guys when two cute girls are in front of the band?

I didn't care.

I learned later that Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, the two guys, were composers and arrangers too.

Who cares? I was busy watching the cute girls!

My introduction to ABBA was "I do I do I do".

It sounded a lot like Pat Boone's "Love letters in the sand" but it was OK.

After all, the two ABBA girls were a lot more interesting to look at than Pat Boone!

Eventually, I became a fan because of great songs:

like "Chiquitita",

the very inspiring "I have a dream",

the great mystery of "Fernando",

the bouncy melody of "Super Trouper"; and last but not least,

a great love song like "The winner takes it all".

ABBA faded fast in the 1980s. I have not seen them recently. Yet, they were great for a 5-7 year stretch about 25 years ago!




Is "Holiday" really 40 years old?



Check out the charts. It was 40 years ago that The Bee Gees released their third single, "Holiday":

"Ooh you’re a holiday , such a holiday

Ooh you’re a holiday , such a holiday

It’s something I thinks worthwhile

If the puppet makes you smile

If not then you’re throwing stones

Throwing stones, throwing stones

Ooh it’s a funny game

Don’t believe that it’s all the same

Can’t think what I’ve just said

Put the soft pillow on my head

Millions of eys can see

Yet why am I so blind

When the someone else is meIt’s unkind, it’s unkind

Yet millions of eyes can see

Yet why am I so blind

When the someone else is me

It’s unkind, it’s unkind

Ooh you’re a holiday , ev’ry day , such a holiday

Now it’s my turn to say , and I say you’re a holiday

It’s something I thinks worthwhile

If the puppet makes you smile

If now then you’re throwing stones

Throwing stones , throwing stones"

Between 1967 to Maurice's death in 2003, the Brothers Gibb wrote and recorded some of our generation's greatest songs. I still love those early tunes like "Holiday" and "I've Gotta Get a Message to You"!

1967 was a very good year for music to buy 45's & LPs



OK.   I'm getting old. The following songs take me back to 1967:

Hello Goodbye by The Beatles:



NY Mining Disaster 1941 by The Bee Gees:



Ruby Tuesday by The Rolling Stones:



Hello Goodbye was released around Thanksgiving '67.   The song was also included in the "Magical Mystery Tour" LP.   It followed "Sgt Peppers" released in the spring.

It was the 3rd single of the year for The Beatles. The other two were "All you need is love" and "Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields Forever".

"NY Mining Disaster" introduced The Bee Gees to the US and the world. It was one of 4 hits that the Brothers Gibb had in '67. The other three were "To love somebody", "Holiday" and "Massachusetts".

"Ruby Tuesday" by The Rolling Stones was from "Between the Buttons", a great LP with a great cover. The B-side was "Let's spend the night together" which did not get air play on Top 40 radio.

Anyway, there you have it. 

1967 was a great year for pop music!

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